the struggle is real

Jun. 24th, 2017 07:02 am
kareila: a sea turtle with the text "all the way DOWN" (turtle)
[personal profile] kareila
Continuing to have trouble setting aside time to focus on work with the kids home for the summer.

After taking my mom to her doctor appointment and subsequent errands on Tuesday, I spent most of Wednesday through Friday sick in bed with a fever and sore throat, but no other obvious symptoms. Now I'm finally feeling better, and Robby has decided that since Tropical Storm Cindy's gift of some ridiculous number of inches of soaking rain will prevent him from doing his usual maintenance out at our church this weekend, this is the best time to disrupt the downstairs living area and try to finish constructing Connor's loft bed.

If I didn't have to take the kids to swim lessons today, I'd probably flee to the library and try to get some serious work done. Maybe that strategy will work next weekend, if I can find someplace to go that isn't closed for the holiday.

In other news, Steam is having their annual sale and I've discovered that most of their older LEGO games (pre-Marvel) are PC-only. I really wanted to put the Harry Potter games on my laptop so that I could play them without broadcasting them to the rest of the household. There's also a PC game that Connor wants that is too resource intensive for his poor old gaming PC. But I read on Twitter last night that Starship Titanic is on Steam for $1.49, so I'll get that if nothing else. I've been wanting to play it again ever since I saw Passengers.

I'm also realizing how much cheaper and easier to find the PlayStation 4 is compared to the Nintendo Switch, and that's probably also the better platform to choose if I want to play Kingdom Hearts 3, assuming it ever gets released.

6/23/2017 The Nature Area

Jun. 23rd, 2017 10:58 am
mrkinch: Erik holding fieldglasses in "Russia" (binocs)
[personal profile] mrkinch
I intended to walk out Nimitz, but the fog was blowing so badly at 6:45 that I didn't even get out of the car. Instead I drove down to the Nature Area, parking outside the gate, and made four passes: north on Lower Packrat, south on the road/boardwalk, north on Upper Packrat, south again on Loop Road and back around to the car. This time I heard olive-sided flycatcher up on Loop Road; two, in fact. The List: )

Between trying to decide something and being extremely annoyed to see multiple bike tracks on Upper Packrat* I'm pretty sure I was not as observant as I can be. But I had a very active area up on Loop Road: two hairy woodpeckers (both apparently females, having no red at all, not even the red forehead of the juvenile, and yet I strongly suspect one was indeed a juvenile, by fluffiness and behavior; at one point they were beak to beak, as if feeding); a Nuttall's woodpecker; an empidonaxflycatcher, almost certainly a Pacific-slope but it a bit far and in shade; and a brown creeper that play peekaboo with me so successfully that I never got a really good look. It was great.



*What is wrong with people? What is it about "no bikes" signs, narrow wooden stairs, barriers at each end of the bridge, and several downed trees left across the trail that says, THIS IS A TRAIL I MUST BIKE ON! I don't give a shit if they fall down the slope into the poison oak but they're going to seriously injure someone who's walking and birding, like me. The trail is very narrow and the sight lines are short. It's terrifying. Assholes.

Most fucking longwinded ever

Jun. 23rd, 2017 11:16 am
credoimprobus: cartoon cat feigns death (omgwtfbbq sauce)
[personal profile] credoimprobus
I was wondering last night how the hell it could take me six hours to fill in and sync commentary for 15 minutes' worth of footage...but upon inspection this morning, it turns out the answer is "because that was 1300 words' worth of commentary". *FACEHANDS*

(*facehands* because the side thing I'm working on at present is 40 minutes in full, and oh dear god I don't even want to think about the kind of wordcount I'll be dealing with before it's done, at this rate. XD; I'm just saying, the above's what I average per half hour LP episode!)
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
Why a so-called "pro-life" world has a lot of dead women in it. It isn't really pro-life unless it includes food and shelter and clothes for everyone, health care for everyone, and income for everyone. That's pro-life. RetroRepublicans are only pro-birth; they don't give a damn what happens once that baby is here.

In Missouri, if you use birth control, had an abortion or are pregnant (covering all bases, you notice), you can lose a job, be fired, be not hired. I assume they are not counting condoms as birth control, or they'd have to fire a lot of men, and that just wouldn't do, would it? ::sarcasm filter on full blast:: More on this ignorant stupidity here.



***

Police are literally dragging people away from Sen. McConnell's office as protests break out over the Republican anti-health bill. I refuse to call it a health bill; it is against health.

The Trump occupation will allow nursing homes to strip residents of their legal rights. I want this one to go all the way to the Supreme Court so it can be slapped down so hard it echoes. And Trump has removed protections for Yellowstone grizzlies. Can we have *him* tell the grizzlies that? Up close and personal?

Oh, and His Trumpetness's minions say diabetics "don't deserve" health insurance.

***

The Supreme Court unanimously made it harder for the government to revoke anyone's citizenship.

Why aren't bisexuals more welcomed at Pride?

A hospice for elderly dogs who have been abandoned by owners who can't/won't deal with the medical costs that come with age, or whose people have died and have nobody to take them.

All the cool kids are playing Bingo

Jun. 22nd, 2017 02:11 pm
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
on twitter & FB...but I'd rather do it here.

I made this card at
http://myfreebingocards.com
Then I download others' cards, use a photo editor to check off shared interests, and repost.

Jesse the Kingo card

Jesse the Kingo card described )

Meanwhile, in Austin, Texas

Jun. 22nd, 2017 01:41 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Sunset is the same time as in NYC, but sunrise is an hour later.

So... from here to Wavre, the time of sunset is different this time of year but the time of sunrise is the same. And from here to Austin, the time of sunset is the same this time of year but the time of sunrise is different. But on the other solstice, it's the other way around - Austin and NYC share a sunrise time, Wavre and NYC share a sunset time.

There is some way this all makes sense, and I know I've had it explained to me before, but... I guess it didn't make enough sense. (It has something to do with how the sun appears to move in a figure 8?)

Semi-related, Mr. "How did they know it was noon?" reminded me of something. There is an algorithm to convert sundial time to clock time, and vice versa. Apparently, when mechanical clocks first became common, their time was considered inaccurate, and true time was sundial time. This is blindingly obvious the second you hear it explained, but it didn't occur to me until I happened to read it on Wikipedia while looking up common sundial mottoes. (It's later than you think!)

There must have been a middle period in there where the younger generation was chronically annoying the older generation by showing up for things at clock time when the older generation obviously meant real time.

*******************


The Deseret Alphabet, a 38-Letter Writing System Developed by Mormons

Pictures: Colored Honey Made by Candy-Eating French Bees (There's something to pointlessly engineer - flowers with multicolored nectar to make multicolored honey! If they think they can sell pink pineapples, colorful honey is sure to be a hit. And it won't be garbage, so it won't be gross.)

Census: US growing older and more racially diverse

The Mussels That Eat Oil

When the Bus Stop Button is Broken

Medieval medical books could hold the recipe for new antibiotics

Man sent home from work for wearing shorts in over 30°C heat comes back in a dress

Memory for stimulus sequences distinguishes humans from other animals

This ‘Indian Dr. Seuss’ Is Very Fond of Nonsense

How the Liberal Arts Help Veterans Thrive

Urban agriculture only provides small environmental benefits in northeastern US

Supreme Court Says You Can't Ban People From The Internet, No Matter What They've Done

People with disabilities at risk in Central African Republic

Abused children find Japan’s shelters provide little comfort

Desperate Venezuelans set sights on Colombia as worry mounts

Hundreds of Inmates Still Confined to Tent City During Phoenix Heat Wave

Former immigration detainees challenge labor practices

How Our Modern Lifestyles Perpetuate Slavery

War-torn Yemen to get cholera vaccines as death toll mounts

U.S. will take weapons from Kurds after Islamic State defeat: Turkey

Unexpected encounters, part 2

Jun. 22nd, 2017 01:32 pm
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
The new campsite was a dozen or more miles away, next to a creek, and the only sign of bear was aged dry bear scat that was old and dry enough that it didn't smell. Scotty headed for the outhouse -- and backed out. I took a look in -- I've seen pincushions less full of needles. It seems that a porcupine had climbed in through the outhouse's tiny window (chewed a bit larger for the trip, from the teeth marks) in order to gnaw on and lick salt from the toilet seat (yes, sweat contains salt.) Scotty took a pair of plyers from the car and spent half an hour pulling the most obnoxious of the porcupine quills so the place was usable. (I kept a handful of them for years; I think they vanished in a move.)

We put up the tent, hiked a bit more, cooked dinner, put the rest of the food in the car (the creek was too nearby, and we'd used up the things that needed to be chilled. It was a dark night, clouded over, so we went to sleep fairly early.

And in the middle of the night I woke up.

I had the sense that someone was watching me.

It wasn't Scotty. He was asleep, like a rock.

I could barely hear something walking around outside the tent, circling, looking in at the flap (which was zipped to keep out mosquitos but had a gap where it tied,) and circling again. And again. A faint sense of someone breathing. Not as big as the bear, but with more intention and curiosity. It must have circled half a dozen times before it left.

I fell asleep again.

In the morning, it was plain that we'd had a visitor -- a wolf whose paw prints, with the clearly marked claws, were longer than my hand (and I have long fingers). He'd left us an indication that this was *his* territory -- a small mountain of wolf droppings at least a foot high, right in front of the Mustang's fender. We didn't see him again, and I didn't sense him, but I wished I'd had a bit of plaster of paris to make a cast of one of those tracks, and find some proportion chart to learn just how big he was.

We didn't have any more encounters, and stayed there the rest of the time -- but I had my ears and eyes open in case that wolf was keeping an eye on us still.

Rare Pair Fest

Jun. 22nd, 2017 03:25 pm
fragilespark: (Default)
[personal profile] fragilespark
I just signed up for [community profile] rarepairfest 2017! Sign ups close on 28th June, so check it out soon if you're interested. Minimum 1,000 words or completed artwork.

links for Friday

Jun. 22nd, 2017 10:41 pm
tielan: (books - shiny)
[personal profile] tielan
NPR: Why Honeybees Are The Wrong Problem To Solve

From what I understand, the problem is less that 'without bees we won't be able to pollinate anything' and more 'the way we agribusiness is a problem - and the way we use bees in agribusiness is part of that problem'.

--

NPR: The Astrobiology Of The Anthropocene (2016)

Basically, like the Jurassic, Triassic, and other '-cene' eras, we're now in the Anthropocene. A new way of looking at things.

--

The Establishment: Adoption Is A Feminist Issue (But Not For The Reasons You Think)

Ties in with abortion and childbearing, and (I think) points out the issue that if women weren't crowded into a place where they have no economic choices/advantages, then both adoption and abortion rates would drop.

Which is pretty much what this article I linked to (from a Christian minister in Sydney) points out - that having children economically disadvantages women, and if we as a society (or culture, or community) are not going to help a woman bear the burden of children, then even the ones who eventually want children are going to abort if they become pregnant at an inconvenient time.

--

The Atlantic: The Cheapest Generation

What do you do when an entire generation of society largely don't want or can't afford the products you're selling? What does that do to the model of economic growth?

--

Sydney Morning Herald: Three Women Who Regret Motherhood

Earlier this week, I asked if there was any socially acceptable way for a woman to indicate she regretted having children. The kick for that question was this article.

I think the most helpful thing I got was [personal profile] havocthecat saying that perhaps there needs to be some kind of 'mourning ceremony' for all the things that are going to be lost in having a child. A baby shower is supposed to be the joyful, hopeful, encouraging thing, but we don't talk about the negative side of changes to a woman's status when she becomes a mother.

--

Racked: The Politics of Pockets (2016)

How and why women's clothing has no pockets.

--

The New Yorker: China's Mistress Dispellers

The people who are hired to get rid of China's mistresses - chase them off, buy them out - whatever works. And the culture and sociology and reasoning behind the scenes of such a business, as well as an insight into a brief history of Chinese marriage.

--

The New Yorker: Power To The People (2015)

An article about solar power and the part that utility companies - and regulation - may have to play in that; to their advantage, but in the face of the old model. (Man, how does that sound familiar.)

There was an interesting article that popped up as a result of this (or which popped this up as a result) about solar power in Africa - that's a 2017 article, about startups in Africa selling cheap power to sub-Saharan Africans, the advantages, disadvantages, and moral questions. I don't know where that article is, though - I thought I saved it, but maybe not.

--

Modern Maker's Retreat: A New Perspective on Modern Quilting

The last few years have seen arguments over what defines modern quilting, and this woman has an interesting perspective on it all (and one which I've lightly touched on in quilting blogging). Quilting used to be a thrift task - done because there were scraps that needed to be used rather than wasted. Now, it's a creative work of art - done for the joy of it, and by people who have the resources to spend on function-specific tools and fabric. She thinks that's the difference between 'traditional' and 'modern' quilting for her. I can't entirely agree; I think colour and fabric and style comes into play as well.

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ysobel: (Default)
masquerading as a man with a reason

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